Fundraising

Fundraising

The CJGA has been a leader in its field since its inception. Each year, the CJGA strives to develop programs on behalf of its members that will set them apart from the rest. The CJGA understands that the costs associated with CJGA programs and participating in all sports is a burden on many participants and parents but the CJGA also recognizes the many benefits of participating in sports as well.

The Canadian Junior Golf Association is a learning ground for our youth to develop character and learn the game of golf.

Golf is a great game. It teaches our youth fundamental skills that enable them to learn how to interact intellectually with other young people. It allows them to learn valuable lessons they can apply at home and in school in other important societal relations.

Junior Golfer who participate in the game of golf from a young age develop individually. they become more thoughtful as a person more respectful as a teenager, and they continue to mature into adulthood by utilizing those early life golf lessons.

Please find below several opportunities for CJGA supporters and members to help the Canadian Junior Golf Association and its youth to raise funds:

1. Fundraise yourself to support playing in CJGA tournaments

2. Fundraise on behalf of the CJGA to lower costs of participation for yourselves and others

3. Submitting Funds Raised

4. Sample Pledge Form

5. Letter that can be presented to the potential sponsor or donor from the CJGA

 

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1. Fundraise yourself to support playing in CJGA tournaments

Here are some suggestions to help CJGA members raise funds to enable them to fund their CJGA Tournaments and/or CJGA International representation along with all expenses incurred as a result of these events.

Ways to FUNDRAISE for the participant:

1. Approach your local clubs that you play at.

(a) Ask them to create a fund to support playing with the Canadian Junior Golf Association (CJGA).

(b) Approach members of the club and ask them to sponsor you.

(c) Ask the pro shop if you can put a large jar on the counter that people can contribute to near the register. This jar should explain your need and ask for help

(d) Express the advantages that will result in helping you.

(e) The CJGA will provide you with a letter to support this initiative.

(f) Tell them that recognition is given by the CJGA*

2. Approach relatives, friends and friends of friends

(a) Ask them for assistance

(b) Explain why you are pursuing golf as a sport

(c) Tell them without their help that you cannot afford to play all the events that would help you.

(d) Tell them that recognition is given by the CJGA*

3. Approach local business

(a) Ask them to contribute

(b) Ask them to create a fund and have employees contribute.

(c) Tell them that recognition is given by the CJGA*

4. Be creative

(a) creative a day that you can arrange with your local club

(b) have them donate the time to you to raise funds

(c) raise funds based on the number of holes that you play in day

(d) create a form and attach a fee (example $.50 a hole) asking for a pledge for each hole that you complete in a day to support you. (CJGA will provide the pledge

form) (e) approach all members at your club, friends, relative and businesses

*Point out the advantages to the golf clubs, businesses, individuals that support CJGA members.

1. All CJGA supporters who raise:

2. All CJGA supporters will be put on the CJGA list of supporters and received updates on CJGA Tournaments, Media Releases and International Competition

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2. Fundraise the CJGA to lower costs of participation for yourself & others

The Canadian Junior Golf Association is a “registered Canadian amateur athletic association” (RCAAA) not-for-profit organization capable of issuing a receipt for tax purposes for donations received.

How you, the participant, can support the CJGA to lower tournament fees and costs associated with International Events

1. Approach your local clubs, relatives, friends and friends of friends, local business.

2. Ask them to donate the Canadian Junior Golf Association (CJGA).

3. Approach members of the club and ask them to donate.

4. Ask the pro shop if you can put a large jar on the counter that people can contribute in near the register. This jar should explain your need and ask for their donation.

5. Express the advantages that will result them helping the CJGA.

6. The CJGA will provide you with a letter to support this initiative.

7. Tell them that recognition is given by the CJGA on the CJGA Website and in its e-newsletter.

8. Tell them that they will receive a Charitable Receipt for their donation that they can use for tax purposes.

9. Tell them that their donation can make a “Difference” to further the goals of the CJGA.

10. Tell them the Goals of the Canadian Junior Golf Association are to:

 

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3. Submitting Funds Raised

Under the Rules of Amateur Status, all monies collected from a Club, sponsor, government agency or other body by the junior golfer to assist with golf and any related expenses to an event may not paid directly to the individual. Such monies must be lodged with the Canadian Junior Golf Association and will be credited to the junior golfers account and applied to tournaments and/or International Competition in that given year.

All payments should be made out to the Canadian Junior Golf Association in the form of a cheque(s), money order(s) or credit card (Visa, MasterCard or Amex.) with the completed funds form and sent to: Canadian Junior Golf Association, 39 Riviera Drive, Unit 12, Markham, Ontario L3R 8N4.

NOTE:CJGA members should be aware that under the Rules of Amateur Status guidelines, you are allowed you to raise funds for participating in CJGA tournaments and International Events only up to the costs incurred. (See Rules of amateur status below)Junior golfers also should note that there are certain guidelines for donations. Donation receipts can not be given to a sponsor or donor when an amount received is directed to the junior golfer him or herself. However, donations received that are given directly to the Canadian Junior Golf Association with the purpose of supporting junior golf can be receipted for tax purposes.How are funds raised considered?Funds fall into several categories.· SponsorshipSponsors cannot have their name anywhere on the players clothing or equipment unless the sponsor is a manufacturer and the name is on the equipment when sold.· Cash gift or pledge directed to the junior golferAny contribution that is directed to the player himself/herself is considered to be a gift to that person. Since the gift is directed to a particular person, it is not considered a donation..· DonationAny contribution that is made directly to the Canadian Junior Golf Association and used exclusively for furthering CJGA goals and programs are considered donations. All donations can be receipted for income tax purposes.

What is meant by a receipt?

Receipts should not be misunderstood by the sponsor or donor. Receipts fall into two categories.

1. General Receipts are receipts that are issued for monies received that are directed to a player. Sponsorships or gifts given directly to the player only acknowledge that the monies were received by the Canadian Junior Golf Association for the player. Sponsors may be able to use the receipt as an advertising expense but should check with their accounting department to verify its use. Individual donors may only look at it as cash gift to the player.

2. Taxable Receipts are receipts given for a donation. Donations cannot be directed to the player but given only to the Canadian Junior Golf Association to further its goals and programs. As a result, all donations made in such a manner may be issued as a Taxable Receipt for income purposes.

Junior golfers should be aware that sponsors cannot have their name anywhere on the players clothing or equipment unless the sponsor is a manufacturer and the name is on the equipment when sold.

The Rules of Amateur Status as outlined by the RCGA concerning fundraising for you when participating in events or international representation are outlined below.

RULES OF AMATEUR STATUS

Guidelines for Funding of Amateur Golfers: RCGA guidelines for funding of amateur golfers

The Amateur Status Committee of Golf Canada defines an amateur as someone who plays the game as a non-remunerative and non-profit-making sport and who does not receive remuneration for teaching golf or for other activities because of golf skill or reputation.

Prizes in amateur events are limited to a retail value of $1000.

Yet players may receive expenses to play in competitions, accept golf scholarships and make inquiries as to the possibilities of becoming a professional, including playing in a qualifying event provided, if prize money is available, a waiver to any prize money is signed prior to playing.

The purpose and spirit of the rules is to keep the amateur game as free as possible from the abuses which may follow from uncontrolled sponsorship and financial incentive and to safeguard the rules of play and handicapping so that golf can be fully enjoyed by all amateur golfers.

Amateur golfers are permitted to receive funding from a number of sources to assist with the costs of training for and competing in golf competitions. Examples of such funding may include monies from a Club, sponsor, a local council grant or award, a government lottery award or a scholarship or bursary to attend a College or University.

An Amateur may use such funds to assist with expenses that relate directly to training for and competing in golf events. Although not exhaustive, the following are examples of expenses that may be funded on behalf of an Amateur:

However, the Definition of an “Amateur” provides that a golfer plays the game as a non-remunerative and non-profit making sport and, therefore, there are restrictions on how such monies may be used by the recipient. In this respect, it is not permissible for monies to be used to cover the individual’s day-to-day living expenses that are not directly related to training for and competing in golf events.

Although not exhaustive, the following are examples of expenses that may not be funded on behalf of an Amateur:

As stated above, the lists of permissible and prohibited uses of funding do not cover every eventuality and there may be other ways in which an Amateur may seek to use such monies. If an Amateur is in any doubt concerning a proposed use of funding he should contact the RCGA Amateur Status Committee for guidance.

A Club, sponsor, government agency or other body giving monies to an Amateur to assist with golf related expenses may not pay such monies directly to the individual. Such monies must be lodged with the RCGA, CLGA, or the individual’s Provincial Golf Association and will be disbursed in accordance with procedures laid down by the RCGA Amateur Status Committee.

An Amateur in receipt of financial assistance and those providing such assistance should be aware that the player cannot advertise the source of the funding – see Rule 6-2 (Lending Name or Likeness). If any doubt arises in this respect, the player or the provider of the assistance should contact the RCGA Amateur Status Committee for guidance.

(April 2003)

Reproduced from the RCGA website on Rules of Amateur Status.

Click here to see the complete Rules of Amateur Status by Golf Canada

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